Eat Your Career http://www.eatyourcareer.com Helping You Create a Nourishing Professional Life Mon, 23 Mar 2015 11:37:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.3 Why Sharing Credit at Work Is Good For Your Career http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2015/03/why-sharing-credit-at-work-is-good-for-your-career/ http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2015/03/why-sharing-credit-at-work-is-good-for-your-career/#comments Mon, 23 Mar 2015 11:37:24 +0000 http://www.eatyourcareer.com/?p=6315 I talk a lot about how to advocate for yourself, be loud and proud of all you do, and take credit for your work even when others are trying to steal the spotlight. But today, I want to turn that around and talk about the other side of the coin: sharing credit with others. It’s
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I talk a lot about how to advocate for yourself, be loud and proud of all you do, and take credit for your work even when others are trying to steal the spotlight.

But today, I want to turn that around and talk about the other side of the coin: sharing credit with others.

It’s an overlooked, but equally important part of your career success.

A true professional knows that, whenever you experience a great achievement at work, you should be vocal about it! Tell your superiors exactly what you did and how you accomplished it. But, when others are involved, be sure to share credit where it’s rightfully due.

All too often, we get caught up in self-promotion at work—a great tool for building a strong professional reputation—but it’s not a “zero sum” game: For me to “win” doesn’t mean anyone else has to “lose.” In fact, when I help others enjoy a win, I also help myself. Here’s how it works.

You Show You’re a Team Player

Talking up the value and contributions of your teammates shows that you recognize the power of collaboration—and you’re good at it! Speak about what “we” accomplished (not what “I” accomplished) and you’ll become known as a smart person to partner with. Be a shining example of teamwork and people will seek you out.

You Prove Your Confidence

Talking about the great work of others shows you’re not insecure. You have confidence in your own role and the value of your own contributions, so you’re not afraid of letting someone else have their moment of glory too.

Your Demonstrate Leadership

Acknowledging others is a key trait of great managers. When you do so, regardless of your title or position, it shows you have leadership abilities. You gain a reputation as more than just a hard worker; you become seen as someone capable of bringing out the great work in others.

Your Teammates Will Remember

People love to be acknowledged and it just doesn’t happen enough these days. Whether it comes from the CEO or a peer in the next cubicle over, it makes you feel seen and appreciated. People don’t forget that. Plus, it can have a real impact on how their colleagues see them and treat them. While it’s our responsibility to self-promote, it’s awfully nice when others provide some supportive reinforcement.

Above all else, it just feels good to recognize the people around you. It feels honest because it IS honest. Very few victories we experience at work happen without assistance from others. It takes a little extra effort to give an authentic shout-out to your well-deserving teammates, but it’s worth it—for you and for them.

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Personal Updates, Reflections and Looking To The Future http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2015/03/personal-updates-reflections-looking-future/ http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2015/03/personal-updates-reflections-looking-future/#comments Mon, 09 Mar 2015 04:02:30 +0000 http://www.eatyourcareer.com/?p=6309 Well, friends, let me start this blog post by saying one thing: I’m still alive! I know, I know. It’s been…like…forever. Or more accurately, it’s been almost a year. A YEAR! I can hardly believe it. And yet, I can believe it because so much has happened. Here’s a quick overview of what’s been going
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Well, friends, let me start this blog post by saying one thing: I’m still alive!

I know, I know. It’s been…like…forever.

Or more accurately, it’s been almost a year. A YEAR! I can hardly believe it. And yet, I can believe it because so much has happened.

Here’s a quick overview of what’s been going on (and then I promise I’ll get into the details):

  • I endured a painful (though ultimately incredibly necessary) break up
  • I sank into the darkest depression of my life—so deep, I was terrified I might not recover
  • I recovered
  • I released a handful of people and habits that no longer served me
  • I embraced a handful of people and habits that serve me in a way I never knew possible
  • I took my own advice and evaluated my career path…and decided it was time for a change
  • I started a full time engagement as a corporate trainer
  • I was promoted from corporate trainer to program lead in three months
  • I started a new, exciting relationship with the man of my dreams
  • I woke up one morning and thought, “Wow. I’m alive. Probably more alive than I’ve ever been…if such a thing is possible. And I’m so, so grateful.”

In short—it’s been the best of times and the worst of times. Looking back on 2014, I see that old adage is true: “This too shall pass.” Everything—the good, the bad, and the downright ugly—everything is temporary.

Things change and thank God they do. I never would have guessed this time last year that things would change this much, but that’s the beauty of life. Not knowing where you’ll land. And at some point, just learning to trust that wherever it is, you’ll land on your feet.

In truth, my list above offers only a shallow look at what has been, essentially, a dramatic (and at times traumatic) transition in my life and career. Beneath these highlights and lowlights, there were many, many hours spent wallowing in personal reflection, fear, anxiety, confusion, self-pity and indecisiveness. To share it all here would be impossible, but I will address some of the key things you may be wondering.

First, let’s talk work.

I started this business in 2009 and truly loved every minute of it for the first two years. I was absolutely inspired and overwhelmed with excitement for the opportunities that lay ahead.

However, when I moved to Denver in 2011, something slowly began to shift. You see, I’m not exactly the type of person who is naturally cut out for self-employment. Sure, I have a million great ideas (SQUIRREL!). I love being my own boss and making my own schedule. And I truly love my work.

But there’s a whole lot more to it than that. Things like taxes and bookkeeping and selling. (It makes my head hurt to think of it all.) And at some point, all of those things I used to love—the ideas, the flexible schedule, and even the work—those things became double-edged swords. I had too many ideas and not enough time or money to invest in making them happen. I missed not having an office and a steady schedule. I missed doing the work I loved, because the work that paid the bills always got priority.

I’ll write more about my self-employment experience in the future I’m sure, but for now, let me just say this: I worked very, very hard in my business. I believe I probably could have worked even harder—toward the end I certainly slacked—but I just wasn’t willing to do what it would take to keep it alive. I had a great level of success with it, with television appearances and exciting speaking gigs and more, and I’m absolutely thrilled that I had the experience. I could, quite possibly, jump back into it again in the future. I would definitely do things differently if so—and it won’t be tomorrow—but for now, I’m confident in my decision to make this change.

The decision came sometime around April of last year (2013), after many months of painstaking reflection. Once the decision was made, however, I sat on it for about two months, determined not to be hasty.

In June, I started aggressively job searching. Again, I took my own advice and activated my professional network. My very first official interview resulted in a job offer, which I declined (with great anxiety!). It wasn’t a perfect fit, and I wasn’t willing to settle.

By early July, I was submitting resumes through online job boards sporadically but still relying on my network to create the kinds of connections I thought I would need to get a real foot in any door.

Surprise, surprise—the ideal position came from an early morning resume submission through Indeed.com. The job looked absolutely ideal. So good, in fact, I thought I was missing something. An hour after hitting “send” on my application, I got an email asking me to come in that day for an interview. A week later, I was asked to present a short training as a means of “auditioning” for the job. Two days after that, I had an offer.

When the stars align, things just click.

I am firm believer that the right things come along at the right time. And when they’re right, you know it.

I had no hesitation whatsoever about accepting this position and I haven’t regretted it for even a day.

I was hired as a corporate trainer. My role was to design and deliver training courses for internal staff at my new company. (Yep, this is the part of my business I loved that I didn’t get to do enough.)

Three months later, I was promoted to Program Lead. I now create and oversee our entire Personal & Professional Development Learning Program for the company, which currently consists of 5 individual, ongoing projects.

When it’s right, it just clicks.

So that’s it for the work update (for now). Let’s move on to the personal stuff…a far more difficult update to put on paper.

I’m not one for airing my dirty laundry, so I’ll be somewhat vague while still hopefully satisfying your curiosity.

I’ve suffered from depression for the majority of my life from the age of about 14. I’ve experienced several major episodes over the years, and this past year was probably one of the worst. When I say “major”, it’s no joke. If you haven’t ever experienced such a thing, imagine this:

Waking up in the morning and wishing you hadn’t…like really. 

Crying yourself to sleep in the middle of the day.

A sense of dread washing over you when you realize there’s no food in the house, and that means you have to get dressed and go outside and be around people.

Believing nothing will ever feel good, taste good, sound good, or look good again.

Knowing you’re hurting your friends and family by pushing them away, but being unable to stop yourself.

Worrying that life as you know it has permanently shifted, and this new life just might not be worth the effort.

I’m sure this isn’t easy to read. It’s no picnic to write either. I’m not ashamed of how I felt, but it does feel strange to share it so openly here.

Still, I can’t ignore this part of what happened this past year. It matters, because it changed.

That worry I had—that the pain was permanent—that was my disease talking. It’s not the truth.

I don’t know what happened exactly, but something sparked me into action. I think I just scared myself so much, I could no longer pretend what was happening was normal or acceptable.

I shifted into action at that point. And this, my friends, is what I know: Action is the key to change. You can’t think yourself into a better place. You just have to take action. Doing the right things—talking to people, changing your habits, asking for help, being decisive, facing your fears—these are the things that shift your thinking. You just have to wake up in the morning and do it, even when you don’t want to. Especially when you don’t want to.

I’m proud of where I’ve been and where I landed. And today, I’m excited for the future.

So let’s talk about that, shall we? Where do we go from here?

This website is my baby. I’ve nurtured it from infancy, and many of you have witnessed its growth through the years. I can no more abandon it than I could a real child. I’ve taken a long, re-energizing break, and I’m ready to re-commit to it.

So, here’s the plan: I have over 250 articles in the archives on this website. Those are a permanent resource for you here.

My passion project now—the thing that really gets my wheels turning—is writing a real, in-print, full-length book. In the meantime, I’m going to continue writing about personal and professional development topics (with my own unique spin of course) regularly for you here. This blog feeds my creativity and keeps me connected to all of you, my dear like-minded fellow professionals. I hope that when my passion project is complete, you’ll want to read it.

I also still have a few (okay…MANY) ideas I’d like to continue playing around with. I truly love personal and professional development and I love helping others explore the same topics that excite me. I also love the freedom and autonomy that come with running your own business. So, while I’m currently on a break from it, who knows what the future holds. When it’s right, things just click. So we’ll see what clicks.

Finally, I’m still doing the occasional speaking and training event for corporate clients. So don’t hesitate to contact me with opportunities. I’m certainly not closing the door on anything. I’m merely following a new path to see where it leads. I hope you’ll choose to continue walking with me by visiting this blog.

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The Art of Conscious Compromise: Finding Your Perfection http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/04/art-conscious-compromise-finding-perfection/ http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/04/art-conscious-compromise-finding-perfection/#comments Thu, 24 Apr 2014 13:47:14 +0000 http://www.eatyourcareer.com/?p=6275 I’ve been thinking a lot about compromise lately. Some people do it too much in life, others not enough. Over the past year, I compromised a lot to be with someone I thought I loved. If you asked him, he’d say he did the same. At some point, the question loomed: If all of this
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I’ve been thinking a lot about compromise lately. Some people do it too much in life, others not enough. Over the past year, I compromised a lot to be with someone I thought I loved. If you asked him, he’d say he did the same. At some point, the question loomed: If all of this compromise is required, is this the right thing for either of us?

It’s a hard, gut-wrenching lesson to learn in romance, but it also applies to your career.

Compromise is indeed a requirement for successful relationships and successful careers. We can’t have everything our way 100% of the time. Holding out hope that you can is setting yourself up for a lot of pain. Sometimes, you have to sacrifice one thing to make other things possible. You give up a plan you had because the other person has a different one. You give up a ridiculously high salary because the job that actually makes you happy doesn’t pay as well as the one that makes you miserable.

It’s a matter of give and take, finding a middle ground where both sides still can be happy—where you’re able to say it’s a worthwhile exchange: By giving up this thing, I get this better thing.

Give up your plan, get love. Give up the salary, get job satisfaction.

It’s hard to know where that “perfect” point is though. You don’t always know the reality of what you’re giving up and what you’re getting and the true value of those things. You don’t always know what other options exist. You have to make choices without knowing if somewhere out there you really could, possibly, have it ALL. Your plan and love. The salary and job satisfaction. Or maybe just a version of life where you’re closer to having it all…

So here’s what I’ve learned about compromise, and it applies to love, career, anything.

Start by knowing what 100% looks like for you. What would your career/marriage/new home etc. be if you had 100% of what you want? Don’t hold back. Go big. Be bold. Define what you really, really want from this thing, whatever it is.

Then, as you survey your options—job prospects, eligible suitors, homes for sale—really ask yourself: What am I gaining and what am I giving up? And ask yourself if the trade is a win.

I call it Conscious Compromise. Too often, I think we compromise without consciously even knowing we’re doing it. We only realize in hindsight that we did, and usually when things aren’t working out, when we’re questioning our choices. At that point, the value of the thing we gave up seems enormous. And maybe it is, but maybe it isn’t.

Conscious Compromise doesn’t mean you’ll suddenly NOT want the thing you gave up. That ridiculously high salary? Yeah, it would still be nice. And you’ll miss it. But if you made the choice consciously—you weighed the gains and losses honestly—you won’t miss the thing you gave up as much. You’ll know it was deemed a reasonable price to pay for what you were getting in return. And yes, that could change. But at some point, you really did give it the thought it deserved.

Conscious Compromise also doesn’t mean you’ll make the perfect choices every time. You may still end up in a bad relationship, a job you hate, or a home that doesn’t really work for you. But that value question I mentioned earlier? The one in bold print? You’ll learn something about that. You’ll learn more about what you value. You’ll learn more about what you’re really willing to give up and what you’re not. And you’ll make different choices next time.

I don’t believe in perfect people or perfect jobs. But I’m still a romantic at heart. I do believe there is a perfect person for me, just like there’s one for you. In fact, there are probably many. And I do believe there’s a perfect job for me, just like there’s one for you—probably many.

By “perfect” I mean that the compromise doesn’t truly feel like compromise. It feels like winning. It feels like you lucked out. If feels like whatever that stupid thing was that you gave up…it never mattered to begin with.

If it sounds like I’m talking out of both sides of my mouth here, I am. You really can’t have everything. But when the right thing comes along, you’ll have everything you need and then some. That’s the paradox that is life.

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How New Hires Can Make a Great First Impression http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/04/new-hires-can-make-great-first-impression/ http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/04/new-hires-can-make-great-first-impression/#comments Fri, 04 Apr 2014 19:47:21 +0000 http://www.eatyourcareer.com/?p=6270 Congratulations! You got hired! Now the hard part starts. The first 30 days on the job is a critical time for creating your professional reputation. Like it or not, first impressions are often lasting impressions. But most of us are so focused on learning the ropes, we forget to consider how others might be receiving
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Congratulations! You got hired! Now the hard part starts.

The first 30 days on the job is a critical time for creating your professional reputation. Like it or not, first impressions are often lasting impressions. But most of us are so focused on learning the ropes, we forget to consider how others might be receiving us. So, how do you ensure you make a strong, professional first impression even as you ramp up to speed in your new gig?

This was the topic of my most recent interview on Fox 31 Denver’s Good Day Colorado. Watch the video below to get my hottest tips for how to get started on the right foot with your new employer and new colleagues from day 1.

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How to Keep Your Skills Sharp When Out of the Workforce http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/03/keep-skills-sharp-workforce/ http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/03/keep-skills-sharp-workforce/#comments Tue, 11 Mar 2014 00:09:20 +0000 http://www.eatyourcareer.com/?p=6262 Whether you’ve voluntarily taken some time off work or involuntarily found yourself unemployed, it’s important to keep your skills sharp while out of the workforce. Whatever the reason you’re not working, every day that passes by where you’re not using your professional skills is a chance for you to fall behind the competition–and that could
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Whether you’ve voluntarily taken some time off work or involuntarily found yourself unemployed, it’s important to keep your skills sharp while out of the workforce. Whatever the reason you’re not working, every day that passes by where you’re not using your professional skills is a chance for you to fall behind the competition–and that could make it very hard to get back into the workforce when the time comes.

Here’s the good news: Even when you’re not working there are ample opportunities for using your professional skills if you know where to look. In my most recent interview on Good Day Colorado, I address this topic and share 5 tips for staying sharp and connected while out of the workforce. Enjoy the video below!

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Free Coaching Call: February 2014 http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/02/free-coaching-call-february-2014/ http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/02/free-coaching-call-february-2014/#comments Sun, 23 Feb 2014 17:53:31 +0000 http://www.eatyourcareer.com/?p=6259 In case you missed it, I hosted my quarterly free coaching call a little while back. You can listen to the recording using the audio player below or download the MP3 if you’d like. Please note: The sound quality isn’t perfect. I’m in the process of upgrading my technology setup so hopefully, in the future,
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In case you missed it, I hosted my quarterly free coaching call a little while back. You can listen to the recording using the audio player below or download the MP3 if you’d like. Please note: The sound quality isn’t perfect. I’m in the process of upgrading my technology setup so hopefully, in the future, this won’t be an issue. Thanks for understanding.

During this session we covered so much, including (but not limited to):

  • How to get attention from prospective employers when you don’t have an “in” at the company.
  • How to manage someone else’s calendar.
  • The number one thing you should do to improve your chances of career success.
  • How to make a good impression in your first month on the job.
  • AND SO MUCH MORE!!

If you’d like to participate in the next call, please register and submit a question by visiting this page. As usual, if you can’t attend the live session, go ahead and register and submit a question if you have one. You’ll be able to listen to the recorded version at your convenience.

BONUS: You can also listen to previous free calls from the registration page.

Download MP3 here

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How to Fall In Love With Your Job (Again) http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/02/fall-love-job/ http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/02/fall-love-job/#comments Fri, 14 Feb 2014 03:43:30 +0000 http://www.eatyourcareer.com/?p=6253 It’s that time of year again where love is in the air. I know most people don’t use the word “love” very often when discussing their work, but I think we should change that. So today, in honor of V-day, I’d like to share a few tips to help you fall in love with your
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Love-Lock

It’s that time of year again where love is in the air. I know most people don’t use the word “love” very often when discussing their work, but I think we should change that. So today, in honor of V-day, I’d like to share a few tips to help you fall in love with your job…again.

Why do I say “again”? Well, I’m willing to bet at some point—whether in the distant past or more recently—you actually did love your job. At one time or another, it probably held all kinds of promise and possibility. It felt exciting to get up and go to work. Maybe that feeling didn’t last longer than a day…or even an hour. But you’ve probably felt it before. Here’s how to get that loving feeling back.

Celebrate Victories (Even Small Ones)

If you’re not yet keeping a list of your professional accomplishments, it’s time to start doing so. After all, everyone enjoys work more when they feel like they’re actually making a contribution.

Of course, equally important to the task of writing your accomplishments down is the task of celebrating them.

Whenever you complete project, overcome a challenge, fix a problem, improve a process, or achieve anything else of any significance in the workplace, give yourself a well-deserved pat on the back. Go get a massage, treat yourself to a frozen yogurt (with extra toppings!), buy a new sweater, toast yourself at dinner that night, take a long bath while listening to jazz…you get the idea. No need to go extravagant, but do something special to recognize and reward your efforts.

Keep a Kudos Log

The workplace is hectic and, unfortunately, people don’t show their appreciation as often as most of us would like. However, when they do, take note of it. Don’t let those nice compliments and gestures of gratitude just roll off your back. Relish them! Write them down in a journal or notebook, print out “atta-boy” emails, save thank you cards, etc. That way, on those days when you’re feeling like no one notices all that you do (and there WILL be many days like that, my friend!), you can look over your notes and remember that some days things are different.

Shake Up Your Routine

Routines are at once positive and negative. On the one hand, they’re helpful tools for making sure we get everything done. They help create habits and habits make us more efficient. However, routines can also be a source of boredom. When things are always the same, life gets…well…boring. Try shaking things up every once in a while just for a change of pace. It can be something as simple as taking a new route to the office in the morning, or doing your Monday tasks on Wednesday. Maybe you can shift your schedule to arrive and leave an hour later. Just minor shifts can create a whole new perspective.

Take on New Challenges

One of the biggest reasons people fall out of love with a job is that it loses its challenge. If you think about the last time you really felt in love with your work, it was likely somewhere around the beginning. Not necessarily the first month or two—most people feel overwhelmed by all the new stuff—but just after that. Right at that point where you know what you’re doing but things are still mentally stimulating. You’re engaged. You’re focused.

After a while the routine (there it is again!) day-to-day tasks and projects can create complacency, and that can feel downright depressing. As human beings, we want to constantly be growing. We want to feel our skills and capabilities stretching. We want to go to sleep each night knowing we’re just a little bit better off than we were when we woke up. The only way to achieve that is by challenging ourselves.

Take on challenging projects and responsibilities. Volunteer to do things that scare you and push you outside your normal comfort zone. Push yourself to achieve bigger and better things each day. And remember—these opportunities don’t always just fall in your lap. They don’t appear from thin air. Go out and make opportunities for yourself.

Proactively Manage Stress

Let’s be honest: Stress is a happiness killer. It’s hard to love something that stresses you out. And yet, work by its very nature is stressful. If you don’t have a stress management plan, now is the time to create one. Don’t wait until you’re actually under a tremendous amount of stress to do this. (BTW, my Stress Management E-workbook might be a helpful tool for you…)

The big key here is that you have a system in place to help you manage stress even when you’re not experiencing it in the moment—things you do that help keep stress levels manageable day-to-day. I’m talking about things like:

  • Enjoying a regular exercise routine (hooray for those feel-good mind chemicals!)
  • Taking regular breaks during the workday (yes, you get things called “breaks” so you can rejuvenate and re-energize!)
  • Following a reasonable, regular schedule (meaning: you leave the office at the right time…not hours later)
  • Getting consistent, restful sleep at night (8 hours folks!)
  • Practicing deep breathing exercises throughout the day, listening music, posting pictures of happy things in your work area, etc.

Look For the Good

I firmly believe that you find what you look for (a lesson I got from my infinitely optimistic mother). If you’re focused on everything bad about work, that’s all you’ll see. Likewise, if you’re focused on the good, you’ll see more of it everywhere you turn.

So seek out the good. Find the small things that delight you about your work—a favorite customer, a favorite task, a favorite co-worker who makes you laugh. Simple pleasures make life worth living and a job worth doing.

Remember: What you project into the world is reflected back at you…so smile, be friendly, share a joke, talk about the good stuff that exists all around you.

And before you know it, you’ll be swooning like a love struck teenager every time you walk into work!

Photo Credit: Allen Skye (Flickr)

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How to Make Smart Career Decisions http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/02/make-smart-career-decisions/ http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/02/make-smart-career-decisions/#comments Wed, 05 Feb 2014 23:41:07 +0000 http://www.eatyourcareer.com/?p=6250 Considering a new job? A new career? Wondering if you should take that promotion or explore opportunities at other companies? Whatever career decision you’re facing, you certainly want to be smart about it. That’s where I come in! In my most recent interview on Fox 31 Denver’s Good Day Colorado, I shared specific steps to
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Considering a new job? A new career? Wondering if you should take that promotion or explore opportunities at other companies? Whatever career decision you’re facing, you certainly want to be smart about it. That’s where I come in! In my most recent interview on Fox 31 Denver’s Good Day Colorado, I shared specific steps to help ensure your next career decision is a good one. While there are no guarantees, following these tips will increase the likelihood that you can look back and feel confident that you approached the decision in a thoughtful, methodical way and reached the best outcome possible.

Looking for more in-depth career advancement advice? Check out the Career Academy, my membership program for career-minded professionals featuring monthly professional development webinars. Learn more here.

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LinkedIn Q&A: What’s the Difference Between Endorsements and Recommendations? http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/01/linkedin-endorsements-recommendations/ http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/01/linkedin-endorsements-recommendations/#comments Thu, 23 Jan 2014 02:22:42 +0000 http://www.eatyourcareer.com/?p=6242 By now, most of you probably know that LinkedIn is the gold standard for online professional networking. Regardless of your opinion of social networking in general, LinkedIn is a site you simply can’t afford to overlook. A basic account is free, though in order to really get the most out of it, you’ll need to
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By now, most of you probably know that LinkedIn is the gold standard for online professional networking. Regardless of your opinion of social networking in general, LinkedIn is a site you simply can’t afford to overlook. A basic account is free, though in order to really get the most out of it, you’ll need to invest a little time and energy into the process.

To help you, I’m starting a blog series wherein I’ll address some of the most commonly asked questions on how to utilize the various features LinkedIn offers.

Today’s article discusses the differences between endorsements and recommendations and which one is “better” for your needs.

Simply put, both the endorsement and recommendation features on LinkedIn provide opportunities to gather “social proof” regarding who you are and what you do. They allow other people to vouch for your skills and experience, thus increasing your credibility for those who don’t already know, like and trust you.

While they work in entirely different ways, both are important parts of creating a compelling profile. In my opinion, recommendations are slightly MORE important, but harder to get (you’ll see why in a minute).

Endorsements

When creating your profile on LinkedIn, you have the option to create a list of skills that define your expertise. For example, in my profile I have the following:

  • Coaching
  • Training
  • Resume Writing
  • Career Development
  • Career Counseling
  • Executive Coaching
  • Public Speaking
  • Career Management
  • Job Coaching
  • Interview Preparation

These currently show up as my “top” skills because I have the most endorsements for these. Additional skills I’ve listed show up below that list. These ones have fewer endorsements but are still relevant to my profile. To help illustrate, here’s a picture of this portion of my profile:

LinkedIn Endorsements

This list of skills helps recruiters and prospective employers find you. Think of them as search terms. They also provide a quick glance overview of your abilities when someone new lands on your profile.

Anyone in your network can “endorse” any of your listed skills simply by clicking a button.

Many times, when you log on to LinkedIn, you’ll get a notification that someone has endorsed your skills, or it will ask you endorse the skills of someone in your network. It’s as easy as pushing a button that says “endorse”.

You can also endorse others by simply navigating to the person’s profile. At the top of the page, a message will pop up that says, “Does so-and-so have these skills and expertise?” And again, it’s as easy as pushing a button.

The ease with which this can be done is both good and bad.

It’s good because you can end up with a nice hefty number of endorsements. Yay for social proof!!

It’s bad because it’s so easy, often these endorsements don’t mean much. I know many people who have endorsed me for skills they have never directly experienced from me. In my opinion, an endorsement SHOULD mean you have directly experienced this person using this skill. However, in practice, that’s not what happens.

I believe most people are beginning to sense the lack of real meaning in endorsements so perhaps in the future LinkedIn will change how this is done. For now, you’ll likely collect them quite easily and they’ll make your profile look nice.

Recommendations

Recommendations on LinkedIn are quite different and, in my opinion, much more meaningful.

A recommendation is a written statement from someone in your network endorsing you and your abilities—like a reference letter but shorter.

In order to receive recommendations, you (generally) need to request them. While people can elect to voluntarily write one for you (what a nice surprise!), it helps to ask directly.

In another article in this series, I’ll address the specifics regarding what to include in your request and who to ask. For now, here are the technical steps to ask for a recommendation:

  • Go to your profile
  • Click the drop down arrow next to the “edit” button
  • Select “ask to be recommended”
  • Follow the 3 steps listed on the recommendation request screen

A recommendation takes more time and effort on the part of the person endorsing you. It’s not as easy as just clicking a button; they actually need to write about their experience with you as a professional. That’s what makes recommendations so powerful.

Here’s a screenshot of two of mine:

LinkedIn RecommendationsRecommendations add a powerful punch to your profile. It’s like a big billboard saying, “Hey! This person is great and I’m willing to put my own reputation on the line to support them!” A recommendation is a demonstration of trust—and it helps build trust in others.

From now on, consider requesting a LinkedIn recommendation in addition to (or instead of) a reference letter from former bosses, etc.

Summary

In short, you want to have both endorsements and recommendations in your LinkedIn profile. Endorsements are easier to get, but recommendations are more meaningful. Both are used to build your credibility. After all, you can claim to have expertise in anything. Only after others confirm your claim does it really become believable.

Do you have a question about LinkedIn? Email me and I’ll be happy to address it in an upcoming article.

Are we connected on LinkedIn? If not, please request a connection and let me know you’re a part of the Eat Your Career community. Here’s my profile.

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Career Necessity: Key Accomplishments List (Free Template Provided) http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/01/career-necessity-key-accomplishments-list-free-template-provided/ http://www.eatyourcareer.com/2014/01/career-necessity-key-accomplishments-list-free-template-provided/#comments Wed, 08 Jan 2014 18:39:14 +0000 http://www.eatyourcareer.com/?p=6223 Download my free Key Accomplishments List template here >> One of my favorite career development tools (and one I recommend on an almost daily basis) is the Key Accomplishments List. It’s such an easy thing to do—and it’s SO valuable—there’s no reason you shouldn’t be tracking your professional accomplishments on a monthly basis (at the
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Download my free Key Accomplishments List template here >>

One of my favorite career development tools (and one I recommend on an almost daily basis) is the Key Accomplishments List.

It’s such an easy thing to do—and it’s SO valuable—there’s no reason you shouldn’t be tracking your professional accomplishments on a monthly basis (at the very least).

Here’s an overview of the process…

Write down—yes, on paper—the specific things you achieved at work each and every month. Some of my clients prefer to do this on a weekly basis; some even do it each day.

You can do this in a number of different ways. You can get a spiral notebook solely for this purpose and write things in there. Or you can create a Word document and simply add to it each time you do this exercise. Or you can use a template of some sort (like the one I shared above).

Why write it down? Simple. Your memory isn’t what it used to be. If you don’t put it on paper, the chances are great that you’ll forget about it. Plus, writing things down forces you to articulate (in REAL words) otherwise vague ideas.

It’s up to you how often you revisit this exercise, but here’s recommendation: Create a reminder on your calendar to update your Key Accomplishments List regularly. Otherwise, months will go by and your list will collect dust. Why? Because your memory isn’t what it used to be. Don’t you remember me telling you that a minute ago??

What To Include

  • The specific challenge you were facing, problem you were trying to resolve or situation you were in.
  • The specific actions you took to confront the challenge, fix the problem, manage the situation, etc.
  • The outcome—the specific results of the actions you took. Remember to focus on those things that add value to your organization. Whenever possible, provide quantifiable and measurable results (i.e. numbers). Cite the dollar amount you saved, the percent increase in productivity you created, the number of work hours you saved, etc. It’s perfectly fine to estimate as long as you have a logical process for how you got to that number.

How to Use Your Key Accomplishments List

  • Share it with your superiors during performance reviews. Use it in the preparation process to jog your memory about what you’ve been working on and why you deserve that raise, promotion, bonus, etc.
  • Use it to update your resume. Remember that resumes should always be accomplishment focused—not a mere list of job duties. (If you need help with this, check out my resume services here.)
  • Use it to motivate yourself. Whenever you’re feeling down or like your work just doesn’t matter (hey, we all feel like that from time to time!), pull out your list and celebrate your awesomeness.

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